The world must be coming to an end

The world must be coming to an end (1)

(A traditional Scottish Song)                                                                                        The Clyde, Glasgow

From "A Song-book of Folk and Pop Music" by Mario Papa & Giuliano Iantorno, Zanichelli Editore, Bologna, 1977 

 

I sent her for cheese, oh then, oh then,

I sent her for cheese, oh then.

I sent her for cheese,

But she fell and broke her knees,

Oh the world must be coming to an end, oh then.

 

I sent her for eggs, oh then, oh then,

I sent her for eggs, oh then,

I sent her for eggs

But she fell and broke her legs,

Oh the world must be coming to an end, oh then.

 

I sent her for bread, oh then, oh then,

I sent her for bread, oh then,

I sent her for bread

But she fell and broke her head,

Oh the world must be coming to an end, oh then.

 

I sent her for meat, oh then, oh then,

I sent her for meat, oh then,

I sent her for meat

But she fell and broke her feet,

Oh the world must be coming to an end, oh then.

 

1. The folk singers Robin Hall and Jimmy Macgregor have picked up this song in the streets of Glasgow. It is an example of the free and easy humour which can be sometimes found in this kind of songs.

 

Glasgow

Although Edinburgh is the capital, Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and one of the greatest shipbuilding centres in the world. With a population of about 1,000,000 people, glasgow is also the main centre of commerce and industry. It lies on the northern bank of the river Clyde, which flows into the Firth of Clyde on the west coast of Scotland. Ships, iron and steel, metal goods and textiles are Glasgow's most importantmanufacturers. Glaswegians, as the inhabitants of Glasgow are familiarly called, are proud, honest and hard-working, with a characteristic sense of humour. They speak both Gaelic and English. The Scots speak English with a particular accent, and one of the characyeristics of this accent is the pronunciation of the letter ‘ r’ with a trill of the tongue.

Glaswegians, like ali Scotsmen, like good food and drink. A famous national dish is ‘Haggis’'. It is made from the heart,liver and lungs of a sheep or calf, chopped with onions, seasonings, suet, and boiled in a bag made from the stomach of a sheep or a calf. Scotland's favourite alcoholic drink is Scotch whisky. The Scots have been making whisky since 1400 and they export more than 40 million gallons of `Scotch' every year.