When the Saints go marching in


Spirituals and Gospel Songs

When the saints go marchin’ in  (Traditional)

From “ A Song-book of Folk and Pop Music”

by Mario Papa & Giuliano Iantorno, Zanichelli Editore, Bologna, 1977

 

Oh when the saints go marchin’ in, (1)

Oh when the saints go marchin’ in,

Oh Lord I want to be in that number,

When the saints go marchin’ in.

 

Oh when the moon goes down in blood, (2)

Oh when the moon goes down in blood,

Oh Lord I want to be in that number,

When the moon goes down in blood.

 

And when the rebel nation (3) comes,

And when the rebel nation comes,

Oh Lord I want to be in that number,

When the rebel nation comes.

 

And when the trumpets have to call,

And when the trumpets have to call,

Oh Lord I want to be in that number,

When the trumpets have to call.

 

Oh when the saints go marchin’ in,

Oh when the saints go marchin’ in,

Oh Lord I want to be in that number,

When the saints go marchin’ in.

 

Possible additional verses:

 

Oh when the new world is revealed, etc.

And when the sun begins to shine, etc.

And when the day of judgement comes, etc.

 

(1) This song, which originally was a traditional protestant hymn, became later one of the most popular “jaz tunes”.

(2) This line means: “When the moon sets.”

(3)The rebel nation: the Southern States, that is the slave states, which formed a Confederacy diring the Civil war in the United States (1861-1865).

 

Louis Armstrong

Daniel Louis Armstrong was born in New Orleans on July 4, 1900. His early life was very poor and difficult. When he was 13 he was sent to ani orphan's home for boys where he began his life as a musician. In fact the music instructor at the home ínvited young Louis to join the school band, and Louis played the tambourine, the drums and the bugle. Fínally he tried the cornet. The young boy later became the greatest jazzman who has ever lived, giant among American jazz musicians. To most peopie he was just ` Satchmo ', a name he received by accident when a British newspaper editor misunderstood the name `satcheimouth' originally given to him because of bis large, laughing mouth. But whatever he was called, his trumpet, his grave voice, his ` stat' singing (the way he used his voice to sìng wordless varìatìons on the melody), endeared Louis Armstrong to millions the world over. Because of Satchmo, the style of jazz changed. Not only did his influence bring about a new rhythmic freedom for the performer, but the accent in a jazz performance was now on the soloist ìnstead of on the group. Never  before in the history of black music had one indivídual so compietely domìnated an art form.

Armstrong’s style was copied equally by saxophonists, trumpet players, pianists and all the instrumentalists who make up the jazz picture. Armstrong died on June 6, 1971.

pular music” by John Rublowsky, C 1967 by John Rublowsky, Basic Books Inc. Publishers New York)